Stories Behind The Buckeye State
Monday September 25th 2017

Columbus non profit hopes to resurrect trolley complex

Photograph by the Columbus Compact Corporation

Local nonprofit developer, the Columbus Compact Corporation (“the Compact”), has big plans for a property just south of Franklin Park—at the corner of Oak Street and Kelton Avenue.  Built in 1872, the dilapidated complex has become the object of neighborhood scorn in recent years, but that’s all about to change.

The Compact, along with the city of Columbus, is seeking community input, regarding future use of the facility. So far, suggestions have included: performance space, artist studios, retail stores, and restaurants. To learn more about the Compact, and how you can become involved in this project, please visit their website or facebook page.

 

See It For Yourself:


Sources:
Columbus Dispatch– “Officials hope to rescue old trolley site

 

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